Spotlight on Tricia Dower

In October of last year, we published Stony River by Tricia Dower, a coming-of-age novel that put the so-called innocence of the 1950s on trial for its dark secrets. Dower has since published a sequel through Caitlin Press entitled Becoming Lin, originally released in Canada and followed this year with a US release.

Recently, our managing editor Lisa Graziano asked Dower why she created the three very different teen girls with different, and unusual, lives to contrast with one another.

Stony River was an expansion of a short story that appear in my Shakespeare-inspired collection, Silent Girl,” Dower explained. “In that story, Linda, Tereza and Miranda first appear. The story was inspired by The Tempest’s Miranda and the two other girls were created to react to the mystery and strangeness of her as well as to support the story theme of sexual awakening.”

In Becoming Lin, the character of Linda has grown up with hopes of trying to escape her parents and her hometown. She marries and follows a minister to Minnesota and begins to discover her true self in a study of marriage across Vietnam-era political uprising and the civil rights movement.

Residing in British Columbia, Dower is the author of these two novels and a previous collection entitled Silent Girl. Her novels have been built from a single story in that collection and expanded into the universes they are now.

To learn more about Dower and her work, visit her website and be sure to pick up these books for great summer reading.

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About Leapfrog Press
Leapfrog Press was created to search out, publish, and aggressively market books that tell a strong story. Leapfrog began its life in Wellfleet, Mass., at the outer end of Cape Cod, in 1993. In 2008 we migrated to Falmouth, Mass., and in 2012 we made the move to Fredonia, N.Y., a town with a rich creative history and an equally rich present in the arts and science. Our list is eclectic and includes quality fiction, poetry, and nonfiction; books that are described by the large commercial publishers as midlist, and which we regard as the heart and soul of literature.

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